Tuesday, November 25, 2014

The End

Tomer Persico:
The question, then, to paraphrase Gershom Scholem’s remark, with which we began, is whether Zionism will be able to withstand the impulse to realize itself conclusively and become history.
Shlomo Maistre:
The consummation of the world is the return of Judah's scepter, in the hand of King Solomon's seed, to the Temple.
The Temple Mount is the end towards which Zionism has ever strived, of course.

Fulfilling prophecy is not the end of only Zionism, but actually the end of history - the consummation of the world - and this is manifestly evident to anyone able to see that Zionism is the process of restoring Judaism and that Judaism, as original monotheism, is inherently true.  In sum, Zionism is collective ba'al teshuva - effectively.  Insofar as one understands Zionism as Judaism, the former likely has restored the latter.  Reclamation of the Temple Mount is the final realization of Judaism.

The reader, no matter how tender, cannot doubt this most conceited writer's exceptional percipience, acuity, and ingenuity.  These innate attributes of his intuition have rendered his mind monstrously proficient in understanding - understanding that which is and that which must be.  This proficiency in understanding was initially by this writer only used - used in understanding only that which is, used in service of changing one's mind about what ought to be, used through intellectual revolution.

Understanding can be used in service of what ought to be or what must be.  Never both.

As what is changes and - in accordance with what must be - inevitably diverges from any articulation of that which ought to be, there is increasing incentive to use understanding in service of what must be instead of what ought to be.  This path typically leads to learned apathy.  This writer's such path led to "Deductive Prosecutions" by virtue of not only his exceptional intuition but also his austere, contrarian, and mystical intellectual disposition.

That his prose is unusually acerbic, elegant, and epodic does not grant this writer a reprieve from having engaged in the most obtuse method of expression, which is the written word.  Even the most tender reader, though, must concede that his unusual prose - given its purpose - reduces the magnitude of his crime, since it is in well enough imitating the form of revelation to evince its function that prose may be sufficiently anachronistic to fulfill the paradoxical purpose of communicating truth to prove the inherent futility of all communication, whether written or not.

I have revealed mortal truths - at once shadows, consequences, and proofs of Truth, that unity of being, that eternal essence that binds all that is, that which is beyond the scope of human comprehension.  This was perhaps worthwhile, but definitely unnecessary.

I remain without remorse.